Teenager Emotions – Some Intriguing Research

Being a teenager is difficult work — both for the teenager and those who surround them. Mixed within this tumultuous life event are their emotions — those effervescent expulsions that can sometimes leave us perplexed as to what just happened. Brain research may have a possible explanation.

Recent research points to the developing teenage brain and it’s inexperience at recognizing multiple emotions simultaneously as a possible reason for this sometimes bewildering display of fireworks. Learning and the Brain (one of my favourite sites to go looking for neat stuff related to learning) recently posted a blog by Andrew Watson which highlighted this fascinating research on teenager emotions.

Teenager Emotions Can Feel Like a Roller Coaster at Times

At the heart of the study is an analysis of why teenagers are so frustrating at times, especially when they are experiencing multiple emotions simultaneously.

Every Child Has a Gift

Every child has a gift. But, being able to receive it means FIRST being able to recognize it. Schools are in a unique position to do that.

Mission Possible: To recognize, celebrate and nurture every child’s gift.

When we celebrate the gift that each child provides we enable that child to reach new heights of achievement. In public education, our doors are open to every child — every need, every complexity. Finding a child’s strengths can sometimes be the most difficult and frustrating part of our job. You see, for some children, their outward selves can mask their inner beauty through such things as learning or behavioral challenges, lack of attendance or other life complexities.

Finding the magic inside each child can be difficult — but it’s there — in every last one of them.

Resilience – A Necessary Part of Personal Success

October 10th is World Mental Health Day (sponsored by the World Health Organization – WHO). What a great day to talk about RESILIENCE and its importance in providing students with a pathway to success.

When I went through teacher training I learned about a number things like lesson construction, effective assessments and curriculum content. We didn’t spend a lot of time learning about student resilience — in fact, I’m pretty sure it wasn’t even mentioned. And that’s probably because it wasn’t a concept being discussed among educators 30 years ago. I doubt that you could find one that incorporated it into the recipe for student success.

Resilience: The capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; personal toughness or the ability to bounce back.

What I’ve discovered over my career is that a student’s success is intimately linked to their ability to withstand disappointment, failure or setbacks. Their resilience is a critical part of their success story.